Reimagining Aid Design and Delivery

Sooner, Simpler, Smarter: Policy Change for Better College Choice

The consortium of the Center for Law and Social Policy, College Board, Institute of Higher Education Policy, New America Foundation, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, Young Invincibles, and NCAN all came together to simplify the financial aid system and increase transparency in higher education. For an overview of the problems they tackled and proposed solutions, click below.

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Back to Basics: Simplifying the Financial Aid Process to Increase Access & Success

As part of the Reimagining Aid Design and Delivery Project, the College Board makes four recommendations to simplify the financial aid process. They include: a needs-analysis formula based on adjusted gross income and family size, using prior-prior year tax information in financial aid calculations, increased number of fields for IRS data sharing with the Department of Education, and early awareness of financial aid eligibility. To read more about these proposals, please click below.

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Mapping the Postsecondary Data Domain: Problems and Possibilities

The paper, Mapping the Postsecondary Data Domain: Problems and Possibilities, along with its accompanying technical report, outlines how existing national data sets can be amended, added to, or linked together. Reviewing recent developments in the field—from voluntary data initiatives to state report cards and dashboards to the federal College Scorecard—the paper identifies a core set of measures across these efforts aimed at answering key questions.

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College Blackout: How the Higher Education Lobby Fought to Keep Students in the Dark

This new report tells the story of how the private nonprofit higher education lobby, whose members rely heavily on federal financial aid, drove efforts to preempt the creation of a federal student unit record system that would enable students, families, institutions, and policymakers to answer fundamental questions about college value. Although those institutions represent a minority (less than 15 percent) of undergraduate students, they often exercise outsized influence on federal financial aid policy. Changing politics, however, mean that the industry organizations that represent the vast majority of the country’s undergraduates now support a student unit record system.

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